Tag Archives: Labor

Election Propaganda: The Advertisements That Will Make You Cringe

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Recent election advertising makes me wonder whether it is possible for any political party to make an ad that doesn’t look like propaganda. Maybe it’s from all the film analysis I had to do at school, but I sincerely struggle to see these ads as anything less than ridiculous.

Without further ado, the awards are…

Sex Appeal

Surprisingly, this does not go to Tony Abbott. No, the Greens have stolen it.

When I first saw this Greens ad, I genuinely thought it was a joke. On second look, it has the perfect amount of, in the words of Tony Abbott, “sex appeal”, to keep the viewer hooked until the punch line at the end. It even incorporates an iPhone to show that the Greens are hip and down with the young people and there are enough close-ups of screaming faces at the end to make sure you understand the emergency of the situation.

Most Natural Performance

“I believe that investing in local schools (pause), like this one here, ” he says, pointing behind his shoulder while his eyes remain fixated down the barrel of the camera. The seamlessness of Kevin Rudd’s performance deserves an Oscar. At the very least, he could give weather presenters a run for their money.

Most Inspiring

There stands Prime Minister Rudd on a sunny day amid background shrubbery. His voice, of course, is accompanied by happy music, which crescendos as the video progresses to match the rising level of inspiration. “I know for sure that the old politics of negativity Just. Won’t. Work”, he says with a sort-of-smile on his face and hand gestures to match.

With this positive outlook in mind, I bring the next award.

Best Horror Film

Cue the doomsday music you often hear in horror films when the killer is hiding behind the curtain. A high angle shot looms over Tony Abbott’s helpless victims. A gloomy voiceover croaks into your ear as the stage light is symbolically switched off over the glum-faced ‘losers’. The simple slogan “If he wins, you lose” evokes the appropriate amount of edginess in anyone who doesn’t like losing. Most importantly, a dark shadow is cast over Abbott’s sinister face, looking more like a character from The Godfather. Real subtle, Labor.

Heartbreaker
This Liberal ad speaks to the sentimental among us, marking the third anniversary of “Labor’s Carbon Tax Lie”—there’s even a cake and a candle! The sombre music and slow-motion montage bring back a flood of haunting memories.

If you look carefully at the bottom-right, you can even spot a sneaky Kevin prancing and laughing jubilantly, followed by his best pal, Julia, after the carbon tax is passed. The ad even sneaks in that awkward photo of what looks like Kevin and Julia smooching.

Best Disney Remake

I sense Walt Disney won’t be happy with how similar the background music of this Liberal ad sounds to ‘Beauty and the Beast’. It has the magical feeling of a Disney movie with smiling faces and a sprinkle of Australian slang—“having a go” and “land of opportunity”—in true Tony Abbott style.

At the end of the ad, there sits Tony on an airplane (in what looks like Business Class), looking out the window with hope as the light shines on his face (hint: symbolic for the promising future under the Coalition).

So there you have it – the ads that are supposed to inform the electors. Mind you, I’m not complaining. I would rather political agendas be sensationally blatant than perniciously subliminal. Use all the dramatic music and plastered smiles that you want – just don’t expect us to take your ads seriously.

Published in Vibewire, 24 August 2013. 

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Australia far from settled on refugees

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In a sea of political rhetoric, phrases like “stop the boats, “refugee rights” and “queue jumping” seem to constantly get splashed around. Problems, causes, symptoms and solutions get swirled together, often making it difficult to grasp the complexities of the asylum seeker issue.

Rudd’s PNG Solution gave fresh lungs to voices across the political spectrum. Over a month later, the Coalition has finally made its move.

Early on, the left voiced outrage at Labor’s PNG solution with Greens leader, Christine Milne, accusing Rudd of lurching so far right that he leapfrogged Tony Abbott in cruelty.

In a political standoff, the right found itself facing a Labor policy that looked uncannily like its own – ‘offshore processing’ and ‘stopping the boats’ seemed to be the phrases of the day. Abbott’s initial response seemed baffled and ambiguous. “I welcome it, but it won’t work under Kevin Rudd, ” he said. Later, at the federal debate 11 August, in almost schoolyard “you copied me” style, Abbott said: “let’s face it, we invented off-shore processing.”

But on Friday 16 August, Tony Abbott came out with bigger guns and a more coherent response in an attempt to distinguish Liberal from Labor and secure the conservative votes.  Firstly, Liberal will deny asylum seekers the right to appeal to the courts for refugee status. Secondly, any legitimate refugee found among the 30, 000 asylum seekers who have already arrived will only be granted temporary rather than permanent visas.

There are many stages in an asylum seeker’s journey to Australia. Every stage remains controversial. This is the story Australians tend to hear: a person is manipulated by a conniving boat smuggler into hopping onto a rickety boat without a visa, placing their lives at the mercy of the turbulent high seas. If they survive, the asylum seeker is taken into mandatory detention where their claim for refugee status is processed. If the claim succeeds, questions remain over where they will be settled and what rights they will be given.

Should the boats be stopped?

Both Labor and Liberal have echoed a resounding “yes”.  Australians are no stranger to stories of disastrous boat journeys and deaths at sea. Like most politicians, when Rudd announced his hardline deterrence policy, he framed it as a compassionately motivated attempt to end an exploitative system of boat smuggling. “There is nothing compassionate about criminal operations which see children and families drowning at sea, ” he said.

However, many refugee advocates denied these moral claims, arguing that such deterrence methods merely punish the most vulnerable.

Daniel Webb from Human Rights Law Centre told Fairfax Media that deterrence was the wrong policy. He said deterring boats only addresses the symptom of the problem. The problem, he said, is that there are people in our region who desperately need protection and who lack a safe, viable, alternative pathway to access it. “Now you can shut Australia’s doors but that doesn’t resolve their underlying desperation and their underlying need to obtain protection”, Mr Webb said.

Like Rudd, Abbott seems determined to stop the boats, expressing sentiments of effective border protection. ”The essential point is, this is our country and we determine who comes here, ” Mr Abbott said.

Detention and Processing Claims

With both major parties now supporting offshore detention, the Liberal party has hardened their stance on the processing stage. Shadow Immigration Minister, Scott Morrison, expressed a desire to end Labor’s “tick and flick” approach by removing asylum seekers’ right to appeal. In the March quarter, Labor’s court appeal system saw an increase of approved refugee statuses from 65.3 to over 90 per cent. According to Mr Morrison, this appeal process was being “promoted by the people smugglers to put people on boats”.

Settlement

There are currently 30, 000 asylum seekers “that Kevin Rudd’s already let in”, said Mr Morrison. From these, any legitimate refugee will be denied permanent residency under the Coalition.

In the words of Mr Morrison: “You don’t get the right to stay in Australia forever, you don’t get the right to apply for citizenship, you don’t get the right to bring your family here, you don’t get the right to come and go from the country as you please.”

Refugees on welfare will be signed up to the ‘Work for the Dole’ program where work experience must be completed in order to receive continuing income support from the government. This is because “you shouldn’t get something for nothing if you’re coming to this country, ” said Mr Morrison. According to the government website, this program aims to “give eligible job seekers the opportunity to learn new skills, get work experience and improve their chance of finding a job.”

When a temporary visa expires, refugee status will be reassessed according to whether a person’s home country has improved enough for them to return home.

#AUSylum Conversation

The questions are complex and the answers in Australia remain divided…

Should the boats be stopped and if so, how?

Will policies of deterrence support the greater good in dismantling a boat smuggling system of exploitation or does it merely punish vulnerable individuals? 

Is this a matter of border security, humanitarian obligations or both?

Is ‘queue-jumping’ a myth used to demonise desperate boat people?

Is a system of (potentially indefinite) detention humane and economically viable?

Should asylum seekers be processed on the mainland or offshore?

Should refugees be granted permanent or temporary visas?

Whether you want to learn more, or you want to have your say on these issues, join the #AUSylum Twitter conversation. To tackle these complex questions with you, Vibewire will be hosting these panellists:

  • Joe Hildebrand, journalist from The Daily Telegraph
  • Graeme McGregor, National Refugee Campaign Coordinator of Amnesty International
  • Sara Saleh from Amnesty International
  • Gemma Amy-Lee from I am a Boat Person

Follow the twitter feed and add your piece to the puzzle as we explore these complex issues in 140 or less characters.

Published in Vibewire, 21 August 2013.

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‘Top-down’ policies in NT ‘destined for failure’

Published in the South Sydney Herald, p. 7, 1 April 2013.

Click here to see it online.

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Ada Lee

BROADWAY: On March 21, Labor was put under intense scrutiny – and not just for its infighting. National Close the Gap Day saw nearly 100 protesters voice their frustration over Labor’s continuation of “top-down” policies in Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. Blocking the Broadway footpath outside Labor MP Tanya Plibersek’s office, campaigners not only called for the repeal of Stronger Futures but also for the protection of suburbs like Bankstown from being swallowed into the system.

Labor’s Stronger Futures legislation will leave Aboriginal people “without a cultural future”, said Aboriginal activist, Ray Jackson. At the rally, he said: “We have no intention of being assimilated by this government, previous governments or future governments. We are Aboriginal and we are proudly so. We will not become a darker version of white Australia.”

Bankstown Aboriginal activist, Sue Gillett, believes “Stolen Futures” is “all about control and making people feel that they are hopeless, helpless and cannot make decisions to save their own lives,” she said.

Protesters are particularly dissatisfied with the expansion of income management beyond the NT into trial sites, including Bankstown NSW. Federal Greens candidate for Sydney, Dianne Hiles, criticised income management as ineffective. “To dictate where people can shop is … going to build up more resentment and be counterproductive.”

Income management places 50-70 per cent of welfare payments onto a BasicsCard, which disallows purchase of certain goods such as alcohol, tobacco, pornography and gambling products. It can be compulsorily implemented on people deemed vulnerable by a social worker.

However, the Department of Community Services (DoCS) has refused to implement the scheme in Bankstown. Robin Croon from the Public Service Association said: “Since the introduction in NSW, not one single family or person has been referred for income management from the Department of Community Services.” The crowd applauded. “That ban will remain,” Ms Croon confirmed. “If we are taken to court, then that’s my role to battle that out there.” Ms Hiles says she supports the move.

Key protest organiser, Paddy Gibson, advocates for the empowerment of community-run organisations in the NT through a “huge injection of resources into the [Aboriginal] communities”. Asked whether this may be seen as unfair special treatment, Mr Gibson said, “There needs to be a special treatment but not the sort of special treatment we get from the government [under Stronger Futures].”

“[Remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory] are denied what mainstream Australia enjoys,” Mr Gibson said. “They are literally living in third world conditions. The suggestion that [Aboriginal] people are asking for some sort of special treatment in terms of getting more than your average Australian, it’s just ridiculous, really, when you consider the oppression that [Aboriginal] people are living under.”

The Greens’ Ms Hiles suggests that funding should be redirected rather than increased. “We’re already spending an obscene amount of money on this. It’s just not producing any deliverables.”

Howard’s Liberal government introduced the Northern Territory Intervention in 2007. In June 2012, Gillard’s Labor government replaced it with Stronger Futures. Ms Hiles criticised Rudd and Gillard as failing to dismantle Howard’s “top-down, paternalistic” approach, which is “destined for failure”.

Ms Plibersek was at Federal Parliament in Canberra during the Stronger Futures rally on March 21.

For a previous story on this issue, click here.

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